Confessions of a Marketing Student

Hello
My name is Tim and I'm a 21 year old marketing student from New England whose a bit upset with his education

The Moth Podcast: Story behind Ming’s supermarket

thoughtwarehouse:

Why Focus Groups Kill Innovation
“As Steve Jobs famously asserted, true innovation comes from recognizing an unmet need and designing a creative way to fill it. But focus groups can’t identify those needs for the simple reason that most people don’t know what they are missing until they experience it. A focus group can work in adding incremental improvements to an already existing product or service. But for truly game-changing ideas, they are more likely to cast doubt and skepticism upon them just because they are unfamiliar.”

thoughtwarehouse:

Why Focus Groups Kill Innovation

“As Steve Jobs famously asserted, true innovation comes from recognizing an unmet need and designing a creative way to fill it. But focus groups can’t identify those needs for the simple reason that most people don’t know what they are missing until they experience it. A focus group can work in adding incremental improvements to an already existing product or service. But for truly game-changing ideas, they are more likely to cast doubt and skepticism upon them just because they are unfamiliar.”

(via eatitworkit)

Pink Ribbons Inc. Trailer

I once had a an English teacher in high school who survived breast cancer and would not shut up about it. She’d kept on using her story as a sympathy crutch, but little that she knew that everyone has different struggles in life and not all of us can be Lance Armstrong. I’m no pessimist, but if surviving cancer makes you a winner or a hero, what does that make someone who had died from it, a loser?

I couldn’t help but to draw parallels to the green washing phenomena. I feel like the brains of moral philosophers would explode if they saw carcinogenic products with pink ribbons slapped on them.

The United States of America on college education

  • Student: I'm not going to go to college because I don't want to go into debt.
  • USA: YOU USELESS PIECE OF SHIT. YOU'RE GOING TO AMOUNT TO NOTHING YOU FUCKING SCUMBAG. YOU'RE THE REASON WHY MY TAXES ARE SO HIGH.
  • Student: I'm just going to attend a small community college instead.
  • USA: HAHAHA YOU WERE TOO STUPID TO GET INTO A GOOD UNIVERSITY. ENJOY YOUR MCDONALD'S DIPLOMA.
  • Student: I attended a four year university and received a diploma in a field I am interested in. Now I am $50,000+ in debt.
  • USA: YOU DUMBASS. WHY THE FUCK DID YOU GO TO COLLEGE WHEN YOU KNOW YOU COULDN'T AFFORD IT? YOU DIDN'T EVEN CHOOSE A USEFUL MAJOR EITHER. GOD PEOPLE LIKE YOU MAKE ME SICK.

Legal Ways To Get Free Textbooks.

dulceetdecorus:

political-linguaphile:

howtodropoutofschool:

1. Open Culture:  Not a large a selection, but high quality texts. If you just want to skim a book to brush up on a course you took in ninth grade, download one of these. I have yet to be disappointed.

2. Book Boon: Provides free college-level textbooks in a PDF format. Probably the widest range of subjects on the web. The site is also pretty.

3. Flat World Knowledge: The worlds largest publisher of free and open college textbooks. Humanitie texts are particularly difficult to come by, this site has a great selection in all disciplines.

4. Textbook Revolution:  Some of the books are PDF files, others are viewable online as e-books, or some are simply web sites containing course or multimedia content.

5. Library Pirate: I’ve always had an addiction to torrent based pirating. When this site opened a few months ago, I went a little overboard. After dropping two hundred on a paperback spanish textbook, I downloaded the ebook version illegally. I also got a great Psyc text i’m obsessed with.  It will be interesting to see how this site grows- they already have a great selection. 

Amazing. The library at my college actually had a really great selection of almost every textbook I needed for school. I’ve only purchased one book in the past 3 semesters.

(via freshlypluckedscientist)

Clay Shirky: How the Internet will (one day) transform government

Skinvertising - Would You Do It?

Seth Godin: How to get your ideas to spread

At every stage of life, we desire to be noticed and affirmed by others. Infants are born craving affection as much as milk. Children playing do not require the active involvement of nearby adults, but if you try to leave they demand that you watch them play. Adolescents, in their perpetual anxiety to be popular, do not so much look at others through their own eyes as look constantly at themselves through others’ eyes. Those who are dying worry about being remembered after death, though when dead, how can they care if they’re forgotten? As adults, our successes give us little pleasure unless sweetened by others’ admiration. If we dress up, there must be others to see us or our work seems wasted — no one wears a tuxedo at home. A marvelous gardener once told me (speaking for human nature) that he takes more delight in a single garden visitor’s compliment than in all the shrubs and flowers he has ever planted. What is this craving for another’s eye to rest upon us?

Upon reflection, a desire for recognition seems irrational. Since we live in our own minds, why should we care what thoughts are in the minds of others? Is this not like a Canadian fretting about the weather in Mexico? How to explain this need for notice is debatable. Are we so doubtful of our worth that others must attest to it? Conversely, are we so certain of our worth that others must bow down to it?

On Being Nothing – beautiful read by NYT’s Brian Jay Stanley on our constant subconscious need to be validated by others (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via phishphace)